Fucoidan and bone degeneration

Recently I’ve had many discussions and questions concerning skeletal and rheumatic disorders, and what could be done to reverse them – or at the very least, prevent further development and suffering.

Please see my blog posts on the alkaline diet – which resolves health issues at a cellular (including stem cell) level. We simply MUST remove acidic foods from the diet if we are serious about not suffering. Otherwise, we are faced with simply chasing symptoms as they continue to harm our health. This includes sugar, dairy, grains, meat and of course pseudo foods (processed and additives). Genetically modified foods and products also fall into this category but the damage is proving to be far more alarming as our own genes are affected and altered.

The supplement I have seen most effective in treating inflammation is a brown seaweed based extract called fucoidan. There are around 1000 scientific studies on PubMed and even more in respected journals. As with any supplement, this has been pounced upon by pharma in order to cash in on a good thing. Many of these companies have in fact approached the company I recommend in order to manufacture for them as the quality is of such a pure and concentrated nature.

Our bones do not just break down by chance – acidic food, poor posture, injury, exposure to toxins, repeated pounding – all add up to permanent damage. There are now many ‘diagnoses’ for an ever-increasing number of new bone diseases, yet they all come back to the same thing – acidity and habits/lifestyle.

Along with bone degeneration comes excruciating pain – it is the neural involvement that must be addressed.

Research is often boring and something most do not wish to bother with. So I am hoping this summary will allow readers to avoid such measures. (Ref http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/)

Osteoarthritis is the most common and disabling form of arthritis experienced by an increasing number of people as the population ages. It is characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. Whilst it is often regarded as a disease of “wear and tear” through ageing, osteoarthritis has a strong genetic component and is also affected by injury and by diseases such as obesity. In addition to the cartilage itself, osteoarthritis also involves the surrounding tissues, including the synovium and the subchondral bone. Osteoarthritis has an inflammatory component, and undoubtedly, a powerful tissue breakdown component which result in pain and stiffness.

Several recent studies indicate a role of fucoidan in addressing the symptoms of osteoarthritis. Park et al. used a model of collagen induced arthritis, and showed that orally administered Undaria pinnatifida fucoidan successfully inhibited pain. In a small human clinical study, osteoarthritis symptoms were significantly inhibited by oral administration of fucoidan rich seaweed extract. Over three months, symptoms were reduced by 52%. This result is a marked improvement for osteoarthritis symptoms. There was no reduction in TNF alpha which was used as inflammation marker, but an accompanying study in healthy volunteers showed a decrease in Interleukin 6, a marker for chronic inflammation.

The mechanism for the clinically observed reduction in pain of osteoarthritis is unclear. Was pain decreased by the blockade of neutrophils? Cunha showed that fucoidan successfully blocked the accumulation of neutrophils and pain nociception. Cunha’s study emphasized the importance of neutrophils as an originator of inflammatory hypernociception and confirmed that fucoidan blocks the accumulation of neutrophils by selectin blockade in their model.

Neuronal Protection

Increasing interest in reducing or reversing brain ageing and disease has seen many agents assessed for their effects on neurons and brain function. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that causes significant and highly distressing loss of function. It is characterized by the accumulation of beta amyloid plaques in the brain tissue. It has been hypothesized that Alzheimer’s is associated with Herpes infections in the central nervous system. The relatively large size of fucoidan precludes penetration of the blood brain barrier but as noted below, systemic administration was effective in maintaining neuronal function in a mouse model.

Fucoidan shows promise in protecting brain function in a number of ways. It has been comprehensively assessed by Jhamandas for effects on current in neurons and also on the neurotoxic effects caused by beta amyloid in primary culture neuronal cells. Fucus vesiculosis fucoidan at one micromolar concentration could inhibit currents by 15%. It was also able to reverse the current blocking effects of beta amyloid. Fucoidan did not inhibit the aggregation of beta amyloid, but did protect primary cultures of  basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, against amyloid induced cell death.

Cui’s recent research centered on a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated microglial cells. Microglia are usually resting cells in the brain, but if activated, for example by LPS, they change shape, become active and secrete inflammatory mediators and nitric oxide (NO). If too much activation takes place, surrounding neuronal cells die, instigating more inflammation and beginning a cycle of neurodegeneration. 62.5 mcg/mL fucoidan was able to prevent shape change in the LPS exposed microglial cultures, and 125 mcg/mL inhibited NO production. In 2004 Li demonstrated the characteristic fragmented DNA (fDNA) observed in neuronal nuclei in Alzheimer brain was taken up by adjacent activated microglia which then became activated. Blocking the scavenger receptors on the microglial cells with Fucus vesiculosis fucoidan at 40 ng/mL suppressed this uptake.

Pei also demonstrated the scavenger receptors on microglial cells could be successfully blocked by fucoidan. Huang used time lapse recording to investigate how microglia are involved in the growth of amyloid plaques.Fucus vesiculosis fucoidan at 10 micromolar concentration was able to inhibit the amyloid induced microglical clustering effect that gave rise to plaques. Do presented a study on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) induced NO production in glioma cells. Fucoidan inhibited NO production in this model system via a number of signaling pathways.

Luo, from the same research team as Cui, investigated the effects of the same Laminaria japonica fucoidan fraction in a model of Parkinson’s disease in mice [97]. The Parkinson’s inducing agent was given on the 11th day an hour after injection of fucoidan. There was a clear dose dependent protection by fucoidan at 25 mg/kg body weight, including inhibition of lipid peroxidation, enzyme functions and glutathione levels. 

So, what fucoidan product should you use? There are many on the market – our own research has shown that for a comparable product, the monthly cost to be anything between $300 and $800US per month. Yet I have found a Practitioner quality option for around $30 per month – www.goo.gl/C8yvYf

I personally use this product for many purposes within my family, including endometriosis, chronic fatigue, headaches, migraine, arthritis and anti aging. Professionally, I find there may be no limit to its inclusion in any individual seeking good health and in fighting the ravages of time.

To place an order, please visit – www.goo.gl/C8yvYf

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1 Comment

  1. Pingback: ALS – GBS – Polio and Chronic Fatigue… – Chrysalis Integrative Health

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